Prins Claus Conservatoire

The training for musicians who want to specialise in working with people with dementia was created based on research and pilots at the Prins Claus Conservatoire in Groningen and the Royal Conservatoire in The Hague. The lectorate Lifelong Learning in music at the Prins Claus Conservatoire studied the practice of Music for Life, a project by Wigmore Hall Learning and Dementia UK.
Philip Curtis, co-director of EMBRACE Nederland, teaches at the Prins Claus Conservatoire and the Royal Conservatoire. All the musicians of EMBRACE Nederland have followed the module ‘Music and Dementia’ in the Master of Music at the Prins Claus Conservatoire in Groningen. EMBRACE Nederland is convention partner of the conservatoire in Groningen.

    

 

Scientific research

There are several publications of the effects of music on people with dementia. You can read them via the links below.

 

 

In case you are interested in further information about music and dementia, we recommend the following books and articles.

Books

Kitwood, T. (1997), Dementia Reconsidered: The person comes first, New York, Open University Press
Renshaw, Peter (2010), Engaged Passions: Searches for Quality in Community Contexts, Delft, Eburon Academic Publishers
Sacks, Oliver (2007), Musicophilia: Tales of Music and the Brain, New York/London, Random House / Picador PanMacmillan
Scherder, E. (2017), Singing in the brain: Over de muzikale samenwerking tussen muziek en hersenen, Amsterdam, Athenaeum
Smilde e.a., R. (2014), While the music lasts: On music and dementia, Delft, Eburon Academic Publishers
Zeisel, John (2010), I’m still here: Creating a better life for a loved on living with Alzheimer’s, London, Piatkus

Articles

Marshall, N.A. & Shibazaki, K. (2016), Seeking Asylum: The Benefits for Clients, Family Members and Care-givers of Using Music in Hospice Care, in: Asian Journal of Human Services, volume 11, pp. 18-30
Marshall, N.A. & Shibazaki, K. (2017), Promoting Wellbeing: Amylase as an Indicator of Changes in Stress Level in People with Intellectual Disabilities, in: Asian Journal of Human Services, volume 12, pp. 60-76

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